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De Tocht van de "Krassin": Het authentieke verhaal van de avonturen der hulp-expeditie welke werd uitgerust ter redding van de verongelukte "Italia"-bemanning

Art.Nr.:
16653
De Tocht van de "Krassin"
Het authentieke verhaal van de avonturen der hulp-expeditie welke werd uitgerust ter redding van de verongelukte "Italia"-bemanning
Suchanow, Valentin (Journalist aan boord van de "Krassin")
Dutch Language.

In 1928 the crash in the Arctic of the airship "Italia", build and flown by the Italian aviator Umberto Nobile (1885-1978), triggered the first international search and rescue operation in the history of aviation.
Aviators from Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia and Italy made search and rescue flights. Among them was the famous Polar explorer Roald Amundsen who went missing on a search flight with its crew and who was never found. Other search parties became stranded in the Arctic as well but could be rescued later.
Swedish pilot Lundborg was first to land at the crash site and extracted Nobile, the injured commander of the airship. However when Lundborg landed again to rescue the next crewmember, his plane crashed and the its pilot was stranded with the survivors.
It remained to the Soviet icebreaker "Krassin" to finally reach and rescue the suvivors, supported by an aircraft the ship carried on board. The "Krassin" rescued two crewmembers from the ice, spotted by the aircraft, the five remaining survivors from the crash site and later Soviet pilot Boris Chukhnovsky and his four crew, who crashed on a failed landing on the ice near the survivors...

The Airship crashed on May 25, 1928. The first SOS signals were received in Russia on June 3. Nobile was rescued on June 23, the remaining of the Italia survivors were rescued on July 12. The search and rescue effort ended on July 14 with the rescue of the last two stranded rescuers from a small island.

Hardcover
224 Seiten / pages
many photos
good condition, some brown spots on the books edge
Amsterdam - 1929 - Andries Blitz
Art.Nr. 16653